The European Commission makes moves to protect air passengers

There has been some debate over the last few years, particularly following the Icelandic Ash Cloud incident, around what compensation passengers should receive and what is the real definition of exceptional circumstances when it comes to air travel. The European Commission has looked at how things currently stand and has put together a raft of measures to give passengers more compensation when airlines have failed to provide a service but also changes to give airlines more time to try and turn situations around before they have to compensate. The new rules are likely to come into effect in 2014 and will also include a move to reroute passengers on other airlines if their delay is over 12 hours and make responses and outcomes time sensitive, so airlines will need to respond within a certain period of time. Overall the changes will aim to make interpretation much more difficult and make it much clearer to airlines what they need to do to compensate passengers and resolve disputes. In the past passengers have complained that it is difficult to apply the rules against the airlines and there is too many “grey areas”. The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.  Setfords Solicitors are a national full service law firm, with inheritance tax and private client specialist  solicitors in Cranleigh  and across the country.